Georgiana Ilie

Georgiana Ilie, from Romania, writes in-depth features for numerous magazines on subjects including culture, human rights, environment and inspirational people.

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She has worked for various publications and organisations, including the UN Population Fund and the Center for Independent Journalism.

Georgiana was awarded a Marshall Memorial Fellowship for 2008/2009 by the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

For the 2010 fellowship programme, Georgiana examined the difficulties faced by and stigmatisation of victims of domestic violence.

Her article, Battered Wives Shunned in the Balkans, detailed the obstacles abused women face in societies that consider divorce and airing family problems in public taboo.

To compare the treatment and fate of victims of domestic abuse, Georgiana travelled to Austria, France – where reported incidents of domestic violence are among the lowest in the EU - and Serbia.

Georgiana’s research was supervised by Marian Chiriac, an editor for BIRN’s Balkan Insight.

Fellowship Portfolio

Can women that have escaped domestic violence ever regain a normal life?

The roots of violence are socially accepted in religion, tradition and culture of the Balkan countries.

Battered Wives Shunned in the Balkans

Women who evict violent husbands from the family home often face disapproval, even outright hostility, from neighbours and relatives in the patriarchal societies in which they live.

The Alumni Network

What is the Alumni Network?

The Alumni Network is an ever-expanding group of journalists who have all participated in the Balkan Fellowship for Journalistic Excellence.

Projects

Turkey and the Balkans

The re-emergence of Turkey as a growing economic, political and religious power in the Balkans is the subject of the latest Balkan Fellowship for Journalistic Excellence Alumni Initiative project.

Roma Decade

Twelve countries, including several Balkan states, have signed up to the European Roma Decade 2005-2015 initiative. Halfway through the decade, has any real progress been made?